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Awards

Tire Shark - Best Practices Award

Illegal Dumping of Tires 
Illegal Dumping of Tires 
Tire Shark 
Tire Shark 
 

Public Works was honored recently for its innovative and proactive solution to a vexing problem that has plagued the department. Every year, thousands of tires are illegally dumped on county property. After Public Works crews collect the tires, they must be disposed of properly at the landfill in Melissa. Landfill officials conveyed that split tires were easier and less expensive to dispose of than intact tires. So, Public Works staff designed and built at minimal cost, a custom tire shredder operated by hydraulic pump nicknamed the “Tire Shark”. Impressed with the department’s novel remedy, The Texas Association of Counties presented Public Works with the County Best Practices award to recognize the Tire Shark conceived and built by Public Works employees. The plans are also available to other counties interested in taking advantage of the creative design.

50 Miles-Per-Year Asphalt Program - Achievement Award

The Public Works department received an National Association of Counties (NACo) Achievement Award in 2009 for innovations, efficiency and cost savings in implementing the 50 Miles-Per-Year Asphalt Program.

The 50 Miles-Per-Year Asphalt Program’s goal was to pave every mile of Collin County road within 10 years. The county’s swift transition from a rural scattering of farming communities to a major urban and suburban center made it necessary to develop a road upgrade program as fast as possible.

Though the 50-Mile program is a significantly vast expansion of past Public Works road upgrade programs, it had to be integrated into existing Public Works department responsibilities and commitments at no additional costs.

In the previous ten years before this program went into effect, an average of 14 miles of county road per year was upgraded. Using the same funds as in those years, Public Works’ 50-Mile program has upgraded 201 miles of road in the last four years, despite major interruptions – and a few natural disasters such as the 2007 floods. All this continues to be accomplished without increasing existing Public Works resources or funding.