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Frequently Asked Questions

WHAT IS COMMUNITY SUPERVISION? (formerly called Adult Probation)
Community Supervision is an alternative to incarceration that permits offenders to live and work in the community, support their families, receive rehabilitative services and make restitution to the victims of their crimes. The single most used criminal punishment in the U.S. today, Community Supervision is a judicial function governed by the courts that sentence defendants.

When carefully administered and applied only to those who can safely be monitored in the community, it can provide rehabilitation and reintegration of offenders into society, ultimately helping to reduce crime. The Department of Community Supervision and Corrections provides public safety through treatment, planning and prevention. Collin County supervision officers have dual responsibilities of public safety and rehabilitation. Their ultimate goal is to stop the cycle of crime and prevent offenders from becoming serious and violent criminals.

WHY DO WE NEED COMMUNITY SUPERVISION?
The unprecedented growth in the nation's prison population has placed a heavy economic burden on taxpayers in terms of the cost to build, maintain and operate prisons.

According to the United States Justice Department, over 2 million Americans are behind bars. This represents nearly six times as many inmates as we had in 1970.

Society must incarcerate those serious and violent offenders who endanger the community. For many nonviolent offenders, however, Community Supervision is an alternative which both protects society and allows clients the opportunity of rehabilitation.

WHEN IS SOMEONE SENTENCED TO COMMUNITY SUPERVISION?
Offenders report immediately to Community Supervision Officers after judges sentence them to Community Supervision. Officers then interview them, explain the Conditions of Supervision (agreed upon in Court and signed by offenders), and assign them to field offices, usually determined by residence and risk levels posed to the community. Offenders then have a limited number of days to report to their field offices, where they are assigned to Community Supervision Officers (CSO’s). If they fail to report as instructed, warrants are issued.

WHOM MAY CITIZENS CONTACT ABOUT OFFENDERS UNDER COMMUNITY SUPERVISION?
Persons needing information on offenders under Community Supervision may contact the CSO links in the website directory or call the main number at any of the CSCD offices: 972-548-4237 or 972-548-3660 (Bloomdale Courthouse {BCH}, McKinney); 972-547-5790 (Community Corrections Facility, McKinney); or 972-881-3030 (Plano).

Victims of certain crimes may request notification of community supervision violation hearings or of other court cases relating to their victimization.

WHAT ACTION SHOULD CITIZENS TAKE IF THEY OBSERVE OFFENDERS COMMITTING CRIMES?
Call 911.

WHAT ACTION SHOULD CITIZENS TAKE IF THEY THINK THEY OR SOMEONE ELSE IS IN DANGER?
Call 911.

WHAT ACTION SHOULD CITIZENS TAKE IN SITUATIONS OF PERCEIVED HARRASSMENT BY OFFENDERS?
Again, if anyone is in immediate danger, citizens should call 911.

If not, citizens should report these situations to the appropriate CSO’s, who will investigate and determine violations. If the activity continues, it should be reported to the police for criminal investigation.

WHAT PAYMENT METHODS ARE ACCEPTED BY CSCD?
The CSCD accepts payments in the form of money order, cashier’s check, or credit card (Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover).